Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Self Talk

NB:
This article has been created using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to answer my questions. The article is for information purposes only. If you have mental or psychological problems you must consult a medical professional.

MY QUESTIONS AND THE AI GENERATED RESPONSES

jecbster@gmail.com

What is CBT?

CBT stands for cognitive-behavioral therapy. It is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on the relationship between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. The goal of CBT is to help individuals identify and change negative patterns of thinking and behavior in order to improve their emotional well-being and ability to function in daily life. CBT is often used to treat a wide range of mental health conditions, including depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

jecbster@gmail.com

How does CBT work?

CBT works by helping individuals identify and change negative patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving. The therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts, feelings and behaviors are interconnected, and that negative thoughts and beliefs can lead to negative emotions and behaviors.

CBT typically includes several key components:

  1. Identification of negative thoughts and beliefs: The therapist will help the individual identify negative thoughts and beliefs that are related to their problem.
  2. Evaluation of evidence: The therapist will help the individual evaluate the evidence for and against these thoughts and beliefs.
  3. Identification of the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors: The therapist will help the individual identify the relationship between their negative thoughts, feelings and behaviors.
  4. Development of new thoughts, feelings and behaviors: The therapist will help the individual develop new, more positive thoughts, feelings and behaviors.
  5. Practice: The individual will practice the new thoughts, feelings and behaviors in therapy sessions, and then continue to practice them in real-life situations.

CBT can be done on a one-on-one basis or in a group setting and usually last for a specific period of time, usually around 12-20 sessions.

jecbster@gmail.com

How does a belief system work with CBT?

In CBT, belief systems refer to the set of beliefs, values, and assumptions that an individual holds about themselves, others, and the world around them. These beliefs can shape an individual’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and can have a significant impact on their emotional well-being.

CBT focuses on helping individuals identify and change negative or unrealistic beliefs that are contributing to their emotional distress. The therapist will work with the individual to identify their belief systems and evaluate the evidence for and against these beliefs.

For example, if an individual has the belief that “I am not good enough”, the therapist will help them evaluate the evidence for and against this belief. The therapist may help the individual to see that this belief is not entirely true and that there is evidence to the contrary, such as feedback from others, past successes, or personal accomplishments.

Once the individual has a more accurate and balanced understanding of their beliefs, the therapist will help them develop new, more positive and realistic beliefs. These new beliefs will be more in line with the individual’s values and goals, and will help them to think, feel, and behave in more positive ways.

The therapist will also help the individual to practice these new beliefs in therapy sessions, and then continue to practice them in real-life situations. This will help them to build new patterns of thinking and behavior that support their emotional well-being.

jecbster@gmail.com

Is seeking evidence important in CBT?

Yes, seeking evidence is an important aspect of CBT. It is a key component of the cognitive part of CBT, which focuses on identifying and changing negative or unrealistic thoughts. The idea is that by seeking evidence for and against one’s thoughts, beliefs, and assumptions, an individual can gain a more accurate and balanced understanding of the situation, which can help to reduce emotional distress.

The therapist will help the individual to examine the evidence for and against their thoughts, beliefs and assumptions. This process is called cognitive restructuring and it allows the individual to evaluate the evidence for and against their negative thoughts, beliefs and assumptions, to identify any errors in thinking and to challenge any negative thoughts that are not supported by the evidence.

For example, an individual might believe that they are not smart enough to be successful in their career. The therapist will help the individual to evaluate the evidence for and against this belief by looking at past successes, feedback from others, and any other relevant information. By examining the evidence objectively, the individual may begin to see that this belief is not entirely accurate and that there are other factors that contribute to their success.

By seeking evidence, an individual can gain a more accurate and balanced understanding of the situation, which can help to reduce emotional distress and improve overall well-being. It is an important step in the process of changing negative patterns of thinking and behavior.

jecbster@gmail.com

Can self talk be used to aid cognitive restructuring?

Yes, self-talk can be used to aid cognitive restructuring in CBT. Self-talk refers to the internal dialogue that we have with ourselves, and it can have a significant impact on our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In CBT, self-talk is often used as a tool to help individuals identify and change negative patterns of thinking.

When an individual engages in negative self-talk, it can reinforce negative thoughts and beliefs, which can lead to negative emotions and behaviors. For example, if an individual tells themselves “I can’t do this”, it can create feelings of self-doubt and discourage them from attempting a task.

Cognitive restructuring in CBT helps to identify and change negative self-talk. The therapist will help the individual to become aware of their self-talk and to evaluate the evidence for and against their negative thoughts. Once the individual has a more accurate and balanced understanding of the situation, the therapist will help them develop new, more positive self-talk.

For example, instead of telling themselves “I can’t do this”, the individual might tell themselves “I can do this, and I will give it my best shot.” This new self-talk is more positive, realistic and empowering.

Self-talk can also be used as a tool for maintenance of positive changes after the therapy sessions are over. By regularly monitoring and challenging negative self-talk and replacing it with positive self-talk, an individual can maintain the positive changes they have made in therapy and continue to improve their emotional well-being.

jecbster@gmail.com

So, negative self talk must not only be challenged, it must be replaced with positive self talk?>

Yes, that is correct. Negative self-talk can be detrimental to an individual’s emotional well-being, so it is important to challenge and replace it with positive self-talk in order to improve overall well-being.

Challenging negative self-talk involves examining the evidence for and against it, as well as identifying any errors in thinking. This helps the individual to gain a more accurate and balanced understanding of the situation.

Replacing negative self-talk with positive self-talk is an important step in the process of changing negative patterns of thinking and behavior. Positive self-talk can help to build self-confidence, reduce stress, and improve overall well-being. It can also be used as a tool for maintaining the positive changes made during therapy, so that the individual can continue to improve their emotional well-being after the therapy sessions are over.

It is important to note that it might take some time and practice to change negative self-talk habits, but as the individual becomes more aware of their self-talk and learns to challenge and replace negative thoughts with positive ones, it will become more natural and it will become a part of the daily routine.

jecbster@gmail.com

Is self talk normal?

Yes, self-talk is a normal and natural part of human experience. It refers to the internal dialogue that we have with ourselves, and it can take the form of thoughts, images, or words. Self-talk can be both conscious and unconscious, and it can happen at any time, whether we are awake or asleep.

Everyone engages in self-talk to some degree, and it can serve many different functions. It can help us to process information, make decisions, and plan for the future. It can also be used as a tool for self-reflection, self-evaluation and self-motivation. Self-talk can be positive and negative, it can be self-encouraging or self-critical.

It is important to be aware of our self-talk, and to try to maintain a balance between positive and negative self-talk. Negative self-talk can have a detrimental effect on our emotional well-being and can lead to negative emotions and behaviors, while positive self-talk can help to build self-confidence, reduce stress, and improve overall well-being.

In summary, self-talk is normal and it plays an important role in our emotional well-being. It’s important to be aware of it and to strive for a balance between positive and negative self-talk.

The Window: Have you seen it?

“The shortest essay in the recently rereleased collection, Confessions of a Heretic, is entitled “Effing the Ineffable.” In it, the late Roger Scruton speaks of the brief and indescribable glimpses we human beings are sometimes afforded of a world of meaning that seems to exist on a plane just outside of our reach. In these moments arising from contemplation or from the experience of great beauty, we sense that the deep mysteries of existence are somehow brought before our eyes, but they still defy our attempt at understanding. “When they occur it is as though, on the winding ill-lit stairway of our life, we suddenly come across a window, through which we catch sight of another and brighter world—a world to which we belong but which we cannot enter.””

Quote from Here

The Owl and the Rabbits: The Golden Rule*

Once upon a time, there was a wise old owl named Mary who lived in Richmond Park in London. One day, Mary gathered the rabbit family and explained to them the importance of the “golden rule.”

Mary told them that the golden rule is a principle that says “Treat others the way you would like to be treated.” She said that this is important because it means being kind, respectful, and fair to others.

She also added that when we treat others the way we would like to be treated, it makes everyone feel good and happy. And when we don’t follow the golden rule, it can cause problems and fights.

The rabbits listened to Mary and they understood the importance of following the golden rule. They realized that by treating others with kindness and respect, they could make the whole community a better and happier place. From that day on, the rabbits always followed the golden rule and lived in peace and harmony with the other animals in Richmond Park.

*Story created by AI with iteration

The Owl and the Rabbits: Sour Grapes*

Please scroll below pictures for the story.

Once upon a time, there was a wise old owl named Mary who lived in a big park called Richmond Park in London. One day, Mary gathered the rabbit family and told them a story about a fox who wanted to eat some grapes but couldn’t reach them. He got mad and said “those grapes are probably sour anyway.”

Mary explained that this story is about when you want something but can’t have it and then make an excuse for not getting it. She told the rabbits that it’s important to be happy with what you have and not to compare yourself to others. She encouraged the rabbits to be grateful for what they have and not to always focus on what they don’t have.

The rabbits listened to Mary and they learned a valuable lesson. They realized that it’s better to be happy with what you have than to always want more. From that day on, the rabbits were happy and content with what they had and Mary the wise owl was always there to guide them and tell them stories that taught them valuable lessons.

* AI Generated with iteration

Beloved Kiera is unwell -A Special Edition Blog – Two Poems

Note: Kiera is unwell at present having suffered a stroke. She is safe in the loving hands of Anna and Rosanne. Below are two poems by Kiera sent to me by Anna. In the first poem Kiera laments the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth ll and at the same time pays homage to her late Majesty’s great love of animals. In the second poem, communicated a few days ago to Anna, Kiera bravely faces her own mortality and encourages us to believe that love goes on for ever.

A Tribute to Her Late Majesty

A tribute to our dear late Queen Elizabeth

By Kiera

Our Queen has died

This makes me sad…

If I’d known her

I would have had

Such gentle strokes

For she was kind

Such love from her

I would find

A Royal kiss

She would place

Right upon

My furry face

I think on me

She would dote

Her gentle hand

Would stroke my coat

Of all this

I am sure

She was Queen

Her word was law..

She loved us all

This I know

It’s sad to learn

She had to go..

It’s the end

Of her reign

I’m just a dog

But feel the pain

I need to say

One more thing,

Welcome Charles

Our new King!!

Kiera – A Reflection

“Go free”, I heard

“It’s your choice”

But the sound of your voice

Awakened me….

I had one paw on Rainbow Bridge,

Then two…

But I turned

And looked at you….

Your moistened eyes

And soft goodbyes

So touched my heart

I could not part

Not this night…..

The yonder light

Began to fade

And so I stayed….

Such love and healing

Has left me feeling

Renewed in strength

Until at length

I had no pain

And breathed again.

But love is constant, has no end

Remember this, my dear Friend…

My time will come and when it does

It will be right for both of us.

Over 2000 people have read the story of how Kiera came to England from Romania Click here to read the amazing story.

For other blogs about Kiera search the blog for “Kiera”.